Gatsby-Esque

(Brooks Brothers)

(Brooks Brothers)

Well, the long-delayed release of Baz Luhrmann’s The Great Gatsby is almost here and Brooks Brothers is taking full advantage of the film’s lush portrayal of Jazz Age glamour.  The latest “lookbook” from the esteemed haberdashers explains:

From the designs of double-Academy Award-winning designer Catherine Martin, Brooks Brothers produced all the men’s costumes in Baz Luhrmann’s film adaptation of The Great Gatsby.  A majority of the 500 men’s costumes featured in the film were inspired by images and products from the company’s archives.  The resulting costumes added a period-specific authenticity to the film and helped bring F. Scott Fitzgerald’s masterpiece to life in 3D.  Brooks Brothers has adapted the costumes to create a special collection which is available in-store and online.

I’m happy to see that the collection includes a timeless one-button peaked lapel tuxedo.

9 Comments

  1. Jovan

    Don’t you mean 1920s? ;)

    A lot of the collection includes low rise trousers, though. Bleh.

    Reply
    1. Peter Marshall

      Oops – thanks for literary lesson! (I’ve updated the post accordingly.)

      Reply
      1. Andy

        Not digging the pocket flaps on the Brooks Brothers jackets… a design characteristic to seemingly all Brooks Brothers dinner jackets.

        Reply
  2. Joe Zasada

    The one-button peak lapel tuxedo jacket page suggests the high rise tuxedo trousers to accompany them

    Reply
    1. Jovan

      I know, that’s why I said “A lot of the collection includes low rise trousers”, not all. Look at the other suits though. The trouser waistbands sit at least two inches below the bottom button of the jackets.

      Reply
  3. David V

    There’s a lot of little clothing there!

    Reply
  4. Adam Williamson

    The ‘classic’ tuxedo does have a centre vent. (Though this is more a matter of U.S. ‘trad’ styling than simply being incorrect.)

    Reply
  5. Ted Williams Menswear

    I loved the suits within the movie, beautifully crafted and cut to perfection. It has really brought to life an appreciation for old style glamour

    Reply
  6. William Wright

    The other day I was in my local Barnes and Noble at the register line and I noticed a magazine devoted to Leonardo DiCaprio as to his role in the Great Gatsby. On the cover he was wearing a tuxedo that at first glance, looked correct. Upon closer inspection and a quick read of the article itself, I discovered the tuxedo he wore was a two-button jacket and the bow tie (at least he wore a bow tie) was a bit too large to be totally period correct. Leo had a much better looking and correctly worn tail suit in “Titanic” several years back. What is the matter with the designers of these clothes? don’t they think that we readers, especially those of us who wear Black Tie often to know how it should look, won’t notice details like these? Or is it as I suspect, a reach to the teenage and younger girl who wow at every little thing?

    Reply

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